How Much Space Do You Require From Your Host?

For many webmasters, the amount of space they need is a major trouble. Many people don’t know how much space is sufficient for their website. Space, which is also referred as web space, is the amount of data which you can host on the web hosting plan you are provided. If you have a limit on your hosting plan, you will need to stay within the limit. The amount of space you have available is taken up by website files, which are used to display your website. This includes html files, images and multimedia files. Some people don’t know the other dozen things that your space can be made up of. Website backups, log files, FrontPage extensions, design files and scripts all take up the amount of space you have available. Below are the details of the things your allocated space can be composed of.
1.Website Backups: A web hosting plan will have a control panel, from which you control everything associated with your hosting plan. In your control panel, there is an option to create backups. These backups can be created only when you want to, or at specific times which you request. If you configure your backup system to create backups every day, it will do just that. This will consume a lot of space, especially if your website is composed of many large files.
2.Log Files: Log files are like reports which show details about all the visitors that came to your website. All the requests made by the users will be dumped onto the log files.
3.FrontPage Extensions: FrontPage is a site building software run by Microsoft, which is available to many users of shared hosting. Each time your website is accessed, your FrontPage scripts are retrieved. The scripts and files are all stored on the server, which take up space. Your account will only take up space, if you have created your website on FrontPage. For best deals hosting then check DigitalOcean Black Friday Hosting.
4.Emails: If you have emails configured with your hosting account, it will consume space. You do have the option to limit the amount of space allocated for emails. When you create emails on your account, the control panel will ask you to mention the amount of space you wish to allocate for emails. If you do not set a specific amount, your emails will take up as much space as it needs. When you receive large files by email, it will remain hosted on your server until you delete them.
5.Script Files: The PHP and CGI files which make a particular script or website work will need space as well. These files do not generally take up much room, but they can add up in the long term.
6.Databases: MySQL databases store information such as users, passwords, emails, payment preferences, bio’s and more. The information is sometimes encrypted for security purposes, and is only visible to specific users on the system. Databases can be small for small sites and quite large for the bigger websites. For websites that need a database in the backend, it is important to find a host with sufficient amount of space.
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BREAKING NEWS: TEH LULZBOAT HAS OFFICALY SANK WITH 100S OF ANON MEMBERS ON BOARD!

No matter how many bots you gather, no matter how much people you lie to, no matter how much pre-made tools you use, you will _NEVER_ represent the real hacking scene, we warned you, we told you we do not make empty threats, we gave u 48hrs to secure your ircs yet u failed to do so, instead u posted hashes from public forums and then claimed you doxed us and laughed at the fact that i was 17years old. stop telling yourself that u are hackers, putting a ip into a irc is NOT hacking nor is using pre-made tools and scripts to grab databases… you do not represent the anti-sec movement, u are not allowed to greet underground groups like zf0, ab, h0n0, el8 like your member “AnonSabu” was doing, you will never be apart of the underground scene, if anyone thinks you are underground and can actually hack they have no idea about what happens in the underground scene. oh and TeaMp0isoN Issue 2 is coming out VERY soon exposing lulzsec members (pictures, addresses, passwords, ips, phone numbers etc). . . . not so anonymous anymore are you? lets hope that you can swim because the lulzboat just got titanic’d…

quote via personal blog of Lulzsec member @ http://sven-slootweg.nl/

It looks like the members of Lulzsec have been owned by team TeaMp0isoN.  From their twitter, it seems they are taking down Lulzsec’s IRC servers which means it wont be able to ddos anymore.  It also appears anonnews’ irc server is also down.

found via th3j35t3r

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Windows Keyboard shortcuts

All Windows Keyboard shortcuts in a list hope it Will work for you,

Windows key + R = Run menu

This is usually followed by:
cmd = Command Prompt
iexplore + “web address” = Internet Explorer
compmgmt.msc = Computer Management
dhcpmgmt.msc = DHCP Management
dnsmgmt.msc = DNS Management
services.msc = Services
eventvwr = Event Viewer
dsa.msc = Active Directory Users and Computers
dssite.msc = Active Directory Sites and Services
Windows key + E = Explorer
ALT + Tab = Switch between windows
ALT, Space, X = Maximize window
CTRL + Shift + Esc = Task Manager
Windows key + Break = System properties
Windows key + F = Search
Windows key + D = Hide/Display all windows
CTRL + C = copy
CTRL + X = cut
CTRL + V = paste
[Alt] and [Esc] Switch between running applications
[Alt] and letter Select menu item by underlined letter
[Ctrl] and [Esc] Open Program Menu
[Ctrl] and [F4] Close active document or group windows (does not work with some applications)
[Alt] and [F4] Quit active application or close current window
[Alt] and [-] Open Control menu for active document
Ctrl] Lft., Rt. arrow Move cursor forward or back one word
Ctrl] Up, Down arrow Move cursor forward or back one paragraph
[F1] Open Help for active application
Windows+M Minimize all open windows
Shift+Windows+M Undo minimize all open windows
Windows+F1 Open Windows Help
Windows+Tab Cycle through the Taskbar buttons
Windows+Break Open the System Properties dialog box
Run Box (Windows Key + R) or Start Run Write any Commands From bellowed
devmgmt.msc = Device Manager
msinfo32 = System Information
cleanmgr = Disk Cleanup
ntbackup = Backup or Restore Wizard (Windows Backup Utility)
mmc = Microsoft Management Console
excel = Microsoft Excel (If Installed)
msaccess = Microsoft Access (If Installed)
powerpnt = Microsoft PowerPoint (If Installed)
winword = Microsoft Word (If Installed)
frontpg = Microsoft FrontPage (If Installed)
notepad = Notepad
wordpad = WordPad
calc = Calculator
msmsgs = Windows Messenger
mspaint = Microsoft Paint
wmplayer = Windows Media Player
rstrui = System Restore
netscp6 = Netscape 6.x
netscp = Netscape 7.x
netscape = Netscape 4.x
waol = America Online
control = Opens the Control Panel
control printers = Opens the Printers Dialog –

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Exclusive interview of Lulzsec by NewScientist

It was early May when LulzSec’s profile skyrocketed after a hack on the giant Sony corporation. LulzSec’s name comes from Lulz, a corruption of LOL, often denoting laughter at the victim of a prank. For 50 days until it disbanded, the group’s unique blend of humor, taunting, and unapologetic data theft made it notorious. But knowing whether LulzSec was all about the “lulz” or if it owed more to its roots as part of Anonymous, the umbrella group of internet subculture and digital activism, was pure speculation. Until now.

Who is “Sabu”?

I’m a man who believes in human rights and exposing abuse and corruption. I generally care about people and their situations. I’m into politics and I try my best to stay on top of current events.

We’ve seen you cast as everything from the greatest of heroes to the most evil of villains. How would you characterise yourself?

It is hard for me to see myself as either. I am not trying to be a martyr. I’m not some cape-wearing hero, nor am I some supervillain trying to bring down the good guys. I’m just doing what I know how to do, and that is counter-abuse.

What was your first experience with “hacktivism”?

I got involved about 11 years ago when the US navy was using Vieques Island in Puerto Rico as a bombing range for exercises. There were lots of protests going on and I got involved in supporting the Puerto Rican government by disrupting communications. This whole situation was the first of its kind for the island and the people didn’t expect things to go that route. Eventually, the US navy left Vieques.

How did you get involved with Anonymous?

When I found out about what happened to Julian Assange, his arrest in the UK and so on, I found it absolutely absurd. So I got involved with Anonymous at that point.

What operation really inspired you and why?

Earlier this year, we got wind of the Tunisians’ plight. Their government was blocking access to any website that reported anti-Tunisian information, including Tunileaks, the Tunisian version of Wikileaks, and any news sites discussing them.

Tunisians came to us telling us about their desire to resist. “Disrupt the government of Tunisia,” they said, and we did. We infiltrated the prime minister’s site and defaced it externally. When Tunisia filtered off its internet from the world, it was the Tunisians who came online using dial-up and literally allowed us to use their connections to tunnel through to re-deface the prime minister’s websites. It was the most impressive thing I’ve seen: a revolution coinciding both physically and online. It was the first time I had proof that what Anonymous was doing was real and it was working.

What would you like to say to people who say that you and other Antisec/Anonymous/LulzSec members are just troublemakers who have caused untold damage and loss to people for no apparent reason?

Would you rather your millions of emails, passwords, dox [personal information] and credit cards be exposed to the wild to be used by nefarious dealers of private information? Or would you rather have someone expose the hole and tell you your data was exploitable and that it’s time to change your passwords? I’m sure we are seen as evil for exposing Sony and others, but at the end of the day, we motivated a giant to upgrade its security.

But what about hacks that were done “for lulz”?

Yes, some hacks under LulzSec were done for the lulz, but there are lessons learned from them all. In 50 days, you saw how big and small companies were handling their user data incorrectly. You saw the US federal government vulnerable to security issues that could have just as easily been exploited by foreign governments. You saw affiliates of the US government handling sensitive emails and they themselves ignored the FBI’s better practice manuals about password re-use.

With the Public Broadcasting Service site, you saw the media vulnerable to fake articles. And yes, our Frontline hit [the group attacked the PBS’s Frontline television programme website after perceived unfair treatment of Wikileaks] was political, but we also showed what could happen if an organisation were to hack 50 of the biggest media publications right now, online, and distribute a mass news article designed to blend in on each outlet’s site. That kind of thing would cause some serious havoc. I mean, we’re talking about the potential of crashing stocks or spreading damaging rumours. Everything we did had a duality: a lesson and some LOLs at the same time.

When did you realise you had hit the point of no return?

I was at the point of no return when I realised that I could make a change. Operation Tunisia was it for me. Then HBGary [a security firm attacked by LulzSec]. Now Antisec is the biggest movement in years, unifying all hackers and free thinkers across Anonymous and other groups. There’s no going back.

How do you describe what Antisec is about?

Expose corruption. Expose censorship. Expose abuses. Assist our brothers and sisters during their operations in their own countries like the one we have going in Brazil now, Operation Brazil, which is about internet/information censorship. Expose these big multinational companies that have their hands in too much, that have too much power, and don’t even take the time to secure your passwords and credit cards. And finally, discussion and education. We are not sitting idly by and letting our rights get thrashed. It’s time to rise up now.

So what would an Antisec “win” look like?

There is no win. There’s just change and education.

The popularity of LulzSec and Anonymous has inspired many to follow in your footsteps. What words of wisdom do you have for them?

Those who are with me in the fight do not have to be hackers. They can be reporters, artists, public speakers. This movement is about all of us uniting against corruption. But I don’t ask anyone to take my risks. I don’t want anyone to follow me down my path.

Are you afraid of being caught?

There is no fear in my heart. I’ve passed the point of no return. I only hope that if I am stopped, the movement continues on the right path without me.

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Word on the internet is Lulzsec got scared and went into hiding….

Recent developments from the twitterverse:

th3j35t3r release information about Lulzsec’s web server, apparently it had open ports:

LulzSec has gained the ire of many people through the past 50 days. When you target servers of game companies for no practical reason, it’s bound to attract the attention of other savvy hackers. In this case, it was hacker group “TeaMp0isoN”.

A supposed Dutch member of LulzSec had his personal webpage hacked by TeaMp0isoN. The site is down at the moment, but a message was posted before the plugged was pulled:

“Stop telling yourself that u are hackers, putting a ip into a irc is NOT hacking nor is using pre-made tools and scripts to grab databases,” the statement read. “You do not represent the anti-sec movement, u are not allowed to greet underground groups like zf0, ab, h0n0, el8 like your member ‘AnonSabu’ was doing, you will never be apart of the underground scene, if anyone thinks you are underground and can actually hack they have no idea about what happens in the underground scene.”

Threats were made to post personal information of members of LulzSec. This includes names, photos, phone numbers, IP addresses, etc. Essentially, it’s all the information anyone would need to track them down. TeaMp0isoN made the following statement after supposedly hacking LulzSec:

No matter how many bots you gather, no matter how much people you lie to, no matter how much pre-made tools you use, you will NEVER represent the real hacking scene, we warned you, we told you we do not make empty threats, we gave u 48hrs to secure your ircs yet u failed to do so, instead u posted hashes from public forums and then claimed you doxed us and laughed at the fact that i was 17years old. stop telling yourself that u are hackers, putting a ip into a irc is NOT hacking nor is using pre-made tools and scripts to grab databases… you do not represent the anti-sec movement, u are not allowed to greet underground groups like zf0, ab, h0n0, el8 like your member “AnonSabu” was doing, you will never be apart of the underground scene, if anyone thinks you are underground and can actually hack they have no idea about what happens in the underground scene. oh and TeaMp0isoN Issue 2 is coming out VERY soon exposing lulzsec members (pictures, addresses, passwords, ips, phone numbers etc). . . . not so anonymous anymore are you? lets hope that you can swim because the lulzboat just got titanic’d.

It’s hard to tell if statements like this are true, or it’s just some false, internet chest-beating. However, recent developments within LulzSec might lend credence to TeaMp0isoN accomplishing what they stated. It seems LulzSec is “retiring” as it were. The LulzSec name is being abandoned, and the members will go their separate ways, perhaps into another group under another name. The group’s farewell statement mentions a “planned 50 day cruise”, but it’s hard to believe they only wanted to exist for 50 days. The coincidence of being supposedly hacked, and then breaking up shortly after is too hard to ignore. There was even a supposed Monday release planned, as mentioned in their Twitter. Either way, the group has released their last collection of hacked documents which includes things from AOL, the FBI, and personal investigators.

The Lulz Ship has set sail permanently, but there’s always other ships in the harbor.

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Personal info about every Lulzsec member released except for two

Internet hacker group The A Team hacks the fuck out of Lulzsec, releases dox info on most of Lulzsec.

What’s funny to us is that these kids are all “Anti-Sec” yet by releasing their hacks they are forcing these
companies to have to hire security professionals which keeps the Security Industry that they are trying to
expose and shut down, in business. I guess they will realise that later in life when they get out of skid
school.

So we’ve been tracking and infiltrating these kids since the gawker hack. We have the D0x (as they call it)
on everyone except Sabu and Kayla. First we’ll go with the kid who did the gawker hack: Uncommon.

Examples of the doxing info includes:

Now let’s look at EE or EEKDACAT:

How to find EEKDACAT:

EE Uses those Busy Box Bounces that were dropped in the lulzsec/gn0sis private channel logs (which were leaked).

bounce: 89-38-2-102.tcnet.com.br (189.38.2.102) Hacked Busy Box IP (from Nigg).

We back hacked him all the way back to his Home IP in Sartoga NY.

originating ip: 74.67.45.11 cpe-74-67-45-11.nycap.res.rr.com (saratoga ny)

Now this kid actually hacks stuff. He goes around and does his little google query hacking thing. Fing’s his SQLinjections
He then goes and downloads the databases. This is the kid who helped Uncommon with the attack on Gawker.

Here is a big log of all the things he’s hacked and is hacking. Along with proof that he was using a stolen router (which we back hacked him from).

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